Selfheal

Prunella vulgaris

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seedball-flower-selfheal-01

Conservation Status

Green, least concern

Best Time to See

Flowers from June to September

Natural Habitat

Grassland, wood clearings, rough ground, lawns.

A quirky violet-blue wildflower with a squarish, compact head on short erect stems.

Its leaves are hairy, stalked, scarcely toothed, often purple tinged and oval to diamond-shaped. The plant often forms a mat.

Distribution
Found throughout the UK.

Did you know…
As its name suggests, selfheal was traditionally used in herbal remedies – particularly for sore throats. For this reason it was named Brunella, or Prunella, from Braune, the German for quinsy.

The rounded middle tooth of the upper lip of the calyx looks like a hook and was taken as the signature of a vulnerary (wound-healing) herb.

www.plantlife.org.uk for more information

SHOP FOR SELFHEAL

SKY MEADOW

An all blue-flowing native wildflower mix bursting with Cornflowers, Forget-me-nots, Meadow cranesbill, Self Heal and Wild Clary. Did you know that bees see colour in a different way to humans? They respond to blue and ultraviolet light, and this mix is designed to provide an attractive mix of blue wildflowers to help attract our buzzing friends to your balconies and garden beds! See Full Listing.

MUM'S MEADOW

A super wildflower gift tin for your Mum 🙂 This limited edition design is based on our Plantlife Mix – five native wildflowers that are most likely to thrive in the nutrient rich soils commonly found in our gardens. Proceeds from the sale of every tin go directly to supporting Plantlife’s new nature reserve – Greena Moor in Cornwall. See Full Listing.

PLANTLIFE MIX

The ideal mix for garden flower beds! Curated by wildflower conservation organisation Plantlife, this mix includes five native wildflowers that are most likely to thrive in the nutrient rich soils commonly found in our gardens. Proceeds from the sale of every tin go directly to supporting Plantlife’s new nature reserve – Greena Moor in Cornwall. Do pop across to our conservation pages for more information on our work with Plantlife. See Full Listing.